Seeking Different Types of Therapy for DID

Seeking Different Types of Therapy for DID

When you are living with a mental health condition such as dissociative identity disorder (DID), therapy is often a part of the treatment plan. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be an effective launching point, but in my personal experience, it’s been specialized therapy for DID that has helped me grow by leaps and bounds.

Treating DID with Medication Therapy Alone

My first introduction to any kind of treatment or therapy for my DID came in the form of a meeting with my primary care provider. At the time, I was still living undiagnosed, but had experienced a debilitating panic attack that sent me to the doctor. She prescribed me a common antidepressant, but therapy was not yet a part of the equation.

For months, I continued on with my life, pleasantly surprised at the noticeable benefits of the medication I had been given. It wasn’t until I had engaged in several conflicts with family members that I realized medication alone wasn’t going to cut it. I still lacked the tools I needed to prevent panic attacks and communicate efficiently without reaching a boiling point.

Finding a Therapist for DID

I was lucky enough to find a cognitive behavioral therapist in my local area who was taking new patients fairly quickly. Needless to say, I was nervous heading into the experience, never having spoken to a therapist before. Once again, I was surprised at some of the immediate benefits I felt from attending therapy. I felt a weight lifted off my chest as soon as I finished my first session, and as I continued on, I learned an abundance of tools to help me navigate my emotions without having to rely on my medication.

Everything was going well until three years later, my therapist informed me that she was going to be leaving the practice. I felt devastated, and more so, I did not know how I was going to continue my treatment. I thought I had finally achieved the perfect balance of therapy and medication, and this entirely disrupted my system. Little did I know that my departing therapist had a plan, and a whole new diagnosis for me after learning so much about my condition over the years: DID.

The Benefits of Working with a DID Therapy Specialist

I was put in touch with a new therapist in my local area who specialized in DID, and the transition was smoother than I had expected. Right off the bat, I was given the insight I needed to understand my DID, as well as how I could manage it on a regular basis.

More importantly, my therapist had been working with several other patients with DID, meaning she was well-versed in how the condition manifests itself in everyday life. I immediately knew I was in good hands, and since then, I’ve never looked back.

While therapy isn’t for everyone, I believe it is a critical component to the healing journey. I have grown as a person through simply having a mental health professional to speak to on a consistent basis, and I know that it will only continue to yield positive results.

Source

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